Can Exercise Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes?

Exercise Is Very Important For People With Type 2 Diabetes. Exercise Makes Cells More Insulin Sensitive, Pulling Glucose Out Of The Blood. This Brings Down Blood Sugar, And More Importantly, Gives You Better Energy Because The Glucose Is Getting Where It Is Supposed To Be. Any Type Of Exercise Will Do This, But Extra Benefit Is Gained When The Activity Helps Build Muscle, Such As Weight Training Or Using Resistance Bands. The Benefits Of Exercise On Blood Sugar Last About 48-72 Hours, So It Is Important For People To Be Physically Active Almost Every Day.

In general, the best time to exercise is one to three hours after eating, when your blood sugar level is likely to be higher. If you use insulin, it’s important to test your blood sugar before exercising. If the level before exercise is below 100 mg/dL, eating a piece of fruit or having a small snack will boost it and help you avoid hypoglycemia. Testing again 30 minutes later will show whether your blood sugar level is stable. It’s also a good idea to check your blood sugar after any particularly grueling workout or activity. If you’re taking insulin, your risk of developing hypoglycemia may be highest six to 12 hours after exercising. Experts also caution against exercising if your blood sugar is too high (over 250), because exercise can sometimes raise blood sugar even higher.

If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease.

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan.  It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary.

Bicycling is also a form of aerobic exercise, says the HHS, one that makes your heart stronger and your lungs function better, and is a calorie burner to boot. Just riding a few times per week as a casual mode of transportation was found to reduce the risk of obesity, high blood pressure, and triglyceride levels, according to a study published in March 2018 in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

To cycle, you don’t even need to leave your house: A stationary bike can be helpful because you can do it inside, no matter the weather.

If you don’t have an exercise routine in place, start with walking. “Walking is easy for people to do,” Colberg says, “All you need is a good pair of shoes and somewhere to go. Walking is probably one of the most prescribed activities for people with type 2 diabetes.” Brisk walking done at a pace that raises the heart rate is considered a moderate-intensity exercise, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Walking at a quicker clip 30 minutes per day five days per week will help you reach the recommended goal of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise.

The inclusion of regular Exercise is critical for optimal insulin action and glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Current research suggests that Type II diabetes mellitus can be prevented and that all types of diabetes can be controlled withexercise, largely through improvements in muscular sensitivity to insulin. This article discusses diabetes prevention and the acute and chronic benefits of exercise for individuals with diabetes, along with the importance and impact of aerobic, resistance, or combined training upon glycemic control. To undertake physical activity safely, individuals also must learn optimal management of glycemia.

Living well with Type 2 diabetes
If you already have Type 2 diabetes, don’t panic. Even if you can’t reverse it, you can still live a long, happy, healthy life with Type 2 diabetes. It all comes down to managing it: here are some helpful suggestions.

How do you manage Type 2 diabetes?
The most important thing to remember is TEEL:

Take your medicine, as prescribed by the physician
Eat healthy food
Exercise, a little each day
Lose weight if you need to

 

DID YOU KNOW?

If you’re over 45 years age, you should check your blood sugar level every six months regularly!

Thanks for Reading!!

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